Photos of Sukkur

Editor’s Note: Rare black & white photos of Sukkur dating back to 1840s are in the last portion of this page.

Brief History of Sukkur: Sukkur (formerly Aror, Alor and Bakar)  is the capital of Sukkur District. It is the third largest city of Sindh province, situated on the west bank of Indus River. Sukkur ia called Sakharu in Sindhi language which means “superior”. The spelling of the city’s name in Sindhi suggests that it is the origin of the name. Sukkur is nicknamed as ‘Darya Dino’ (the Gift of River), as without the Indus the city would be a desert. The district of Sukkur was constituted in 1901 out of part of Shikarpur District. Sukkur saw a significant socio-economic uplift after the 1930s, when the British built the world’s largest barrage here on the Indus River.
Sukkur has been an important strategic centre and trading route from time immemorial. Alor (or Aror, Sukkur) held the status of capital under the reign of Musikanos, when Alexander invaded the region in 326 BC. The ruins of this ancient town still exist, 8 km east of Rohri, in Sukkur district. The Rai Dynasty built a huge temple of Shiva. In 711 AD, the Arabs invaded Sindh, led by 17-year-old Muhammad bin Qasim, and Sukkur (including all of Sindh and lower Punjab) became part of the Umayyad Caliphate.
Later Mughals and many semi-autonomous tribes ruled over Sukkur. The city was ceded to Mirs of Khairpur between 1809 and 1824. In 1833, Shah Shuja (a warlord of Kandahar, Afghanistan) defeated the Talpurs near Sukkur and later made a solemn treaty with the Talpur ruler, by which he relinquished all claims on Sindh. In 1843,  Sukkur, along with the rest of Sindh, came under British rule until the independence of Pakistan in 1947.

 Lansdowne Bridge Rohri/SukurLansdowne Bridge, linking Sukkur and Rohri, was inaugurated on March 27, 1889. The bridge provided the railway link between Lahore and the port of Karachi. Later, the arched Ayub Bridge was inaugurated on May 6, 1962 and  railway traffic was shifted there. About a hundred feet apart, the two bridges seem like one from a distance.

Pic of Lansdowne Bridge,Over Indus River, Rohri, Lansdowne Railway bridge links Sukkur with Rohri

Ayub Bridge (Ayub Arch) at Sukkur.  Ayub Bridge (Ayub Arch) is a railway bridge over the Indus river between Rohri and Sukkur in Sindh province, Pakistan. This steel arch bridge was inaugurated by President Muhammad Ayub Khan on 6 May 1962. The Ayub Bridge became the world’s third longest railway arch span and the first railway bridge in the world to be slung on coiled wire rope suspenders. On its completion railway traffic was transferred to Ayub Bridge from the adjacent Lansdowne Bridge.

Sukkur Pictures: Beautiful view of Ayub Bridge at Sukkur, the world's third longest railway arch span - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Inauguration  of Ayub Bridge (Ayub Arch) at Sukkur, 1962. President Muhammad Ayub Khan is inaugurating Ayub Bridge at Sukkur on May 6, 1962.

Sukkur Pictures: President Muhammad Ayub Khan inaugurating Ayub Arch (Ayub Bridge) at Sukkur on 6 May 1962 - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Railway Bridge Across Indus River, Connecting Rohri and Sukkur through Bukkur Island Fort. Photo by  msb1606.

Sukkur Pictures: Railway bridge across Indus River, connecting Rohri and Sukkur through Bukkur island fort - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Bukkur Island and the Three Bridges on Indus River at Sukkur. In this photo, one can see on the right the arched Ayub Bridge and Lansdowne Bridge connecting Rohri to Bukkur Island, shown in the middle of the photo. The island of Bukkur has an old historical fortress which is currently being used by Army. On the left side of the photo, one can see the bridge connecting Bukkur island to Sukkur city.

Sukkur Pictures: Photo showing Lansdowne Bridge, Ayub Bridge, Bukkur Fort and the bridge connecting Bukkur island with Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Army Barracks at Bukkur Island, Sukkur 

Sukkur Pictures: Photo taken from Ayub Bridge showing  Army Barracks at Bukkur island, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

An Aerial View of Rohri and Sukkur after Floods in the Indus River. Ayub Bridge and Lansdowne Bridge connecting Rohri to Bukkur island are visible in the middle distance.  A smaller bridge connecting Bukkur island to Sukkur city is also visible. Photo by Jahangir Khan.

Sukkur Pictures: An aerial view of Rohri City and Sukkur City after floods in the Indus River - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Sukkur Barrage (Lloyd Barrage), Opened in 1932. Sukkur Barrage (formerly called Lloyd Barrage) was built over Indus River near Sukkur during British Raj and was inaugurated by Lord Willingdon, the Viceroy of India, on 13 January 1932.  The scheme had been launched by the Governor of Bombay, Sir George Ambrose Lloyd for whom it was named. It was the largest irrigation project ever undertaken, and irrigates the farmlands through its seven large canals. Some of the canals are larger than the Suez Canal.
Sukkur Barrage has 7 Canals. Left Bank canals are Nara Canal, Mirwah Canal, Rohri Canal, Abul Wah and Right Bank canals are Dadu Canal, Rice Canal and Kirthar Canal.
In November 2004, the government of Pakistan initiated a rehabilitation project to revitalize its water storage capacity and distribution efficiency. The project was completed in July 2005. The experts claim that the rehabilitation of the barrage has increased its life for another 60 to 70 years.

Sukkur Pictures: Sukkur Barrage (Lloyd Barrage), opened in 1932 over Indus River - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Night View of Sukkur Barrage (Lloyd Barrage). Photo by by .

Sukkur Pictures: Beautiful Night view of Sukkur Barrage (Lloyd Barrage) - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Stamp Issued by Pakistan Post on Golden Jubilee of Sukkur Barrage (Lloyd Barrage), 1982 

Sukkur Pictures: One Rupee Stamp issued by Pakistan Post in 1982 to commemorate Golden Jubilee of Sukkur Barrage (Lloyd Barrage) - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Lloyd Barrage, Sukkur, 1935 

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Old Photo of Lloyd Barrage, Sukkur, 1935 - Old Photos of Sukkur

Stamps Showing Llyod Barrage  issued on 14 August 1948

Sukkur Pictures: Three stamps showing Llyod Barrage (later named Sukkur Barrage) issued by Pakistan Post on 14 August 1948 - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Inauguration of Lloyd Barrage at Sukkur (The Daily Gazette, Edition of 14 January 1932).  This rare edition of The Daily Gazette (later became The Sind Gazette) shows the Viceroy of India, Lord Willingdon, who inaugurated the Lloyd Barrage (built over Indus River near Sukkur) on 13 January 1932. It was later named as the Sukkur Barrage. The scheme had been launched by the Governor of Bombay, Sir George Ambrose Lloyd for whom it was named.

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Inauguration of Lloyd Barrage at Sukkur, "The Daily Gazette", edition of 14 January 1932 - Old Photos of Sukkur

Plaque at The Lloyd Barrage Sukkur, also known as Sukkur Barrage. Photo by Danyal Gilani.

Sukkur Pictures: Plaque at the Lloyd Barrage at Sukkur, opened in 1932 - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Lloyd Barrage Museum, Sukkur. Photo by usman_gooner.

Sukkur Pictures: Building of Lloyd Barrage Museum, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Entrance to Dadu Canal, Sukkur Barrage. Dadu Canal is one of the three canals emanting from Sukkur Barrage on the western bank of Indus River. Photo by msb1606.

Sukkur Pictures: Entrance to Dadu Canal, Sukkur Barrage - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Three Canals Emanating from Sukkur Barrage at the Right Bank of Indus River. These three canals are Dadu Canal, Rice Canal and Kirthar Canal. Photo by Jahangir Khan.

Sukkur Pictures: Three canals emanating from Sukkur Barrage at the right bank of Indus River - Images, Photos of Sukkur

An Aerial View of Three Canals at Sukkur 

Sukkur Pictures: An aerial view of three bridges and three canals coming out of Indus River at Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Nara Canal, Rohri, Sukkur Barrage. Photo by Skybolt.

Sukkur Pictures: Photo taken from Railway Bridge on Nara Canal, Rohri, Sukkur Barrage - Images, Photos of Sukkur

A Night View of River Indus and Sukkur City

Sukkur Pictures: A serene night view of River Indus with a boat and Sukkur City in the background - Images, Photos of Sukkur

War Mubarak Shrine in Rohri City.  The Shrine of War Mubarak is located near Rohri Railway station towards Sukkur. This Shrine holds a holy Hair of Prophet Mohammed (PBUH). A building was erected around 1545 AD (952 AH) by Mir Muhammad, the then reigning Kalhora Prince, for the special reception of a holy Hair.  Photo by SaffyH – Uploading Iceland Photo’s.

Sukkur Pictures: War Mubarak Mohammad Shrine in Rohri city, Sindh - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Interior view of War Mubarak Shrine in Rohri CityA casket crusted in Gold and silver enshrines the hair of the Holy Prophet (PBUH).

Sukkur Pictures: Interior view of War Mubarak Mohammad Shrine in Rohri city, Sindh - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Remains of Muhammad Bin Qasim Mosque. The Muhammad Bin Qasim Mosque was built at Arore, near Sukkur, on top of a mound by the first Muslim man to step in the region, Muhammad Bin Qasim, in 711 AD.

Sukkur Pictures: Remnants of Muhammad Bin Qasim Mosque on a mound at Arore near Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Minar-e-Masumi and Faiz Mahal at Sukkur. The minaret of Syed Nizam-ud-Din Mir Muhammad Masum Shah (a governor of Mughal Emperor Akbar) is the most conspicuous structure of Sukkur town which can be seen from a far distance. It is called ‘Mir Masum Shah Jo Minaro’ in Sindhi language.This conical shaped minaret was built around 1607 AD (26 metres in circumference, 31 metres in height with 84 steps to the top). Photo by SaffyH – Uploading Iceland Photo’s.

Sukkur Pictures: Minar-e-Masumi and Faiz Mahal located at Sukkur, Sindh- Images, Photos of Sukkur

Sateen Jo Aastan, “The Tombs of Seven Sisters” at Rohri. Sateen Jo Aastan is located on the left bank of the Indus River near Rohri on a small hill. A building on the southern side of the hill is called Satbhain (Seven Sisters).  According to folklore seven unmarried female friends resided here who veiled themselves from all males. But for the fear of a tyrannical Raja, they disappeared in a cave in the side of a hill. Thus they became satti. Probably this folklore has its origins in the Hindu ritual of satti, where widows burnt themselves on their dead husband’s pyre. In reality, however, this is the burial-place of a ruler from Sukkur, Mir Abu Al-Qasim Namkeen (961 A.H, 993 A.H).
On one of the smaller hills that arises out of the river bank on the south has a leveled platform on which there are many carved gravestones. The principal grave is that of Mir Kasim one of the Sabzwari Shahids dated 1018 AD. This was probably the grave that sanctified the place, and the lamp-post and lamp that were placed in front of it are still there; and it gives the name of Than Kasim Shah to the hill. But the name by which it is more generally known is the Hill of the Seven Virgins.

Sukkur Pictures: Sateen Jo Aastan, the Tombs of Seven Sisters at Rohri, Sukkur District - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Another View of Seven Sisters Graveyard at Rohri. Ayub Bridge and Lansdowne Bridge are visible in the background. Photo by Jahangir @.

Sukkur Pictures: Seven Sisters Graveyard at Rohri, Sukkur District, with Ayub Bridge and Lansdowne Bridge in the background - Images, Photos of Sukkur

A Closer View of Seven Sisters Graveyard at Rohri. Photo by mianaamir.

Sukkur Pictures: A closer view of Seven Sisters Graveyard at Rohri, Sukkur District - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Jamia Masjid, SukkurPhoto by .

Sukkur Pictures: A beautiful view of minarets and Jamia Masjid, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Eidgah Masjid in Rohri City. Eidgah Mosque in Rohri city dates back to 1593.  Photo by SaffyH – Uploading Iceland Photo’s.

Sukkur Pictures: Eidgah Mosque in Rohri City, built around 1593 - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Clock Tower at Ghanta Ghar Chowk, Sukkur. Photo by uMa|r.

Sukkur Pictures: Sukkur Clock Tower at Congested Ghanta Ghar Chowk, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Sukkur Clock Tower (Ghanta Ghar) during Night 

Sukkur Pictures: Sukkur Clock Tower (Ghanta Ghar), photo taken at night - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Pir Ilahi Baksh Tower (Ilmi Tower), Sukkur. Pir Illahi Bakhsh Tower (also called ‘Ilmi Tower’) is located on a hill near State Bank of Pakistan, Sukkur. It is 110 feet high and 66 feet wide. The tower was founded by Pir Illahi Bakhsh, minister for education in May 1939 and completed in 1940. Photo by By bukhaari.

Sukkur Pictures: Pir IIlahi Baksh Tower (Ilmi Tower), Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Sukkur Railway Station. Photo by  .

Sukkur Pictures: Entrance of Sukkur Railway Station building, a rickshaw and three motor cycles are parked outside - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Railway Heritage Museum at Sukkur.  Railway Heritage Museum was established in 2005 at Sukkur Railway Station. An old steam engine and a few coaches were brought from Mirpur Khas section. Antiques were collected from almost 60 stations of Sukkur and displayed inside the coaches. Photo by Commoner28th.

Sukkur Pictures: A steam engine and coaches at Railway Heritage Museum at Sukkur during night - Images, Photos of Sukkur

River Indus at High Floods at SukkurPhoto by .

Sukkur Pictures: River Indus (Sindh) in high floods near Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Sukkur Airport Terminal Building. Photo by .

Sukkur Pictures: Security guards at the entrance of Sukkur Airport Terminal building - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Entrance of Lab-e-Mehran Park in Sukkur. Lab-e-Mehran is famous garden in Sukkur, located on Bandar Road, adjacent to the Indus River. There is a separate family area with a small hotel. There is also boat riding facility. Photo by SAN Group 2k.

Sukkur Pictures: Main Entrance of Lab-e-Mehran Park in Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

A Globe near Lab-e-Mehran Park, Sukkur 

Sukkur Pictures: A huge Globe on a road near Lab-e-Mehran Park, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Hockey Stadium, Sukkur. Built at old Railway Ground.

Sukkur Pictures: Photo of Hockey Stadium, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

High Rise Buildings at the Bank of Indus River, Sukkur

Sukkur Pictures: High rise buildings at the bank of Indus River, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

A View of Congested City of Sukkur with Indus River in the Background

Sukkur Pictures: A view of congested Sukkur city with Indus River in the background - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Night View of Icon Departmental Store near Minar-e-Masumi, Sukkur

Sukkur Pictures: A night view of Icon Departmental Store near Minar-e-Masumi, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Day View of Icon Departmental Store, Sukkur

Sukkur Pictures: Icon Departmental Store, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Interior View of Icon Departmental Store, Sukkur

Sukkur Pictures: Beautiful interior view of Icon Departmental Store, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Long Stone Bridge, RohriPhoto by .

Sukkur Pictures: Long Stone Bridge, Rohri, road inaundated by rain water - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Civil Hospital, Sukkur 

Sukkur Pictures: Building of Civil Hospital, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Sukkur

Sukkur Pictures: Photo of Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Government Islamia Science College, Sukkur

Sukkur Pictures: Three storey building of Government Islamia Science College, Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

IBA (Institute of Business Administration), Sukkur

Sukkur Pictures: Building of IBA (Institute of Business Administration), Sukkur   - Images, Photos of Sukkur

St. Mary’s High School, SukkurSt. Mary’s School was started in 1881. But it was not recognized till 1888. It was initially for the children of railway personnel, but in 1897 it was opened to all local people. It was housed in a railway bungalow and shifted to its own building on 23 May 1911. Photo shows St. Mary’s School and church. Photo by SAN Group 2k.
School website: http://www.geocities.ws/uzairarain/School.htm.

Sukkur Pictures: Photo of St. Mary's School and Church, Sukkur  - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Saint Mary’s Catholic Church at SukkurSt. Mary’s Church was built in early 1850s. In February 2006, a mob destroyed the church and was rebuilt and opened in 2009.  This photo was taken in 1992. Photo by Francis Hannaway.


Sukkur Pictures: Saint Mary's Catholic Church at Sukkur, photo taken in 1992 - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Sadh Belo, A Sacred Place for Hindu in an Island at Sukkur. Downstream of the island of Bukkur, and separated from it by a short stretch of river, is the small island of Sat, or Sadh, Belo. On it is a Hindu religious establishment found in AD 1823 by Swami Bakhandi Maharaj Udasi. It is a sacred pilgrimage place for Hindus throughout Sindh and even in India. The island has two inlets, Sadh Belo and Din Belo. To visit Sadh Belo one requires a permission from the department of Auqaf to go there.

Sukkur Pictures: Sadh Belo, A holy Pilgrimage Place for Hindus in an Island at Sukkur - Images, Photos of Sukkur

Old Photo of Sadhu Bela, Sukkur, 1920

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Old Photo of Sadhu Bela, Sukkur, 1920 - Old Photos of Sukkur

Shrine of Zinda Pir, Sukkur, in 1926. The shrine of a saint Khawaja Khizar, known as ‘Zinda Pir’ (also called “Jind Pir”) was built around 925 AD on a small island called “Hajee ka Tau” located north of Bukkur island fort, Sukkur. Unfortunately except the island, nothing much remains of this structure today.

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Island and Shrine of Zinda Pir, Sukkur in 1926, located north of Bukkur island fort - Old Photos of Sukkur

A Bungalow on the Bank of River Indus, Sukkur, 1924. A guard is standing outside a bungalow close to railway line and Indus River in Sukkur. It is probably at the construction site of Llyod Barrage (Construction started in 1923 and inaugurated on 13 January 1932). Photo by Abaraphobia.

Sukkur Rare Pictures: A guard outside a bungalow close to railway line and Indus River in Sukkur, 1924 - Old Photos of Sukkur

Under Construction Bungalow at the Site of Lloyd Barrage, Sukkur, 1924. Photo by Abaraphobia.

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Under construction bungalow at the site of Lloyd Barrage, Sukkur, 1924 - Old Photos of Sukkur

Minaret of Mir Masum Shah, Sukkur, 1910

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Old Photo of Minaret of Mir Masum Shah, Sukkur, 1910 - Old Photos of Sukkur

Lansdowne Railway Bridge, Sukkur, in 1897. A view of Indus River with the Lansdowne Railway Bridge at Sukkur in the background. The Bukkur Fort is also visible on the left.

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Lansdowne Bridge over the Indus River at Sukkur in 1897, Bukker Fort on the left - Old Photos of Sukkur

Shrine of Zinda Pir, Sukkur, in 1897The photograph taken by Henry Cousens shows the shrine of a saint Khawaja Khizar, known as ‘Zinda Pir’ (also called “Jind Pir”). The shrine was built around 925 AD on a small island called “Hajee ka Tau” located north of Bukkur island fort, Sukkur. Unfortunately except the island, nothing much remains of this structure today.

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Island and Shrine of Zinda Pir, Sukkur in 1897, located north of Bukkur island fort - Old Photos of Sukkur

Minaret and Tomb of Mir Masum Shah at Sukkur, 1896

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Avery rare photo of Minaret and Tomb of Mir Masum Shah at Sukkur, 1896 - Old Photos of Sukkur

The Lansdowne Bridge at Sukkur in 1895. Members of World Transportation Commission on an inspection trolley at the Lansdowne Bridge at Sukkur in 1895. Photo by an  American photographer William Henry Jackson.

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Members of World Transportation Commission on an inspection trolley at the Lansdowne Bridge at Sukkur in 1895 - Old Photos of Sukkur

Shrine of Seven Sisters (“Sathbahin” Monument) in Rohri, 1890sA view across the Indus River from Sukkur, with “Sathbahin” Monument (Shrine of Seven Sisters) at Rohri in the middleground.

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Sathbahin Monument (Shrine of Seven Sisters) in Rohri, 1890s - Old Photos of Sukkur

Men and Women Screening Tobacco in Sukkur, 1890 

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Men and women screening tobacco on a street in Sukkur, 1890 - Old Photos of Sukkur

A Rare Photo of Lansdowne Bridge Over Indus River at Sukkur, 1890

Sukkur Rare Pictures: A very rare 1890 photo of Lansdowne Bridge over Indus River at Sukkur, a boat is also visible - Old Photos of Sukkur

Another Rare Photo of Lansdowne Bridge, 1890. Bukkur Fort is visible on the left side of the bridge.

Sukkur Rare Pictures: Another very rare 1890 photo of Lansdowne Bridge over Indus River at Sukkur - Old Photos of Sukkur

Inauguration Ceremony of Lansdowne Bridge at Sukkur in 1889.  Lansdowne Bridge was inaugurated on March 27, 1889.The chief guest was Lord Reay, Governor of Bombay who was deputising for Lord Lansdowne, the Viceroy of India.

Sukkur Rare Pictures: A Very Rare Photo of Inauguration ceremony of Lansdowne Bridge at Sukkur in 1889 - Old Photos of Sukkur

Inauguration Plaque of the Lansdowne Bridge, Sukkur, 1889Inauguration Plaque of the Lansdowne Bridge. It was inaugurated by H. E. Lord Reay (Governor of Bombay) on 27 March, 1889 along with Lt. Col. Conway Gordon (Director General Railways) and Col. W. A. J. Wallace (Director North Western Railway).

Lansdowne Bridge, Sukkur, Inauguration Plaque , 27 March 1889

A Rare Photo of General View of Sukkur City, 1860s

Sukkur Rare Pictures: A Very Rare Photo of general view of Sukkur city, 1860s - Old Photos of Sukkur

A Rare Photo of Bukkur Fort near Sukkur, 1847
Sukkur Rare Pictures: A very rare picture of Bukkur Fort near Sukkur, 1847 - Old Photos of Sukkur
Minar-e-Masum and Tomb of Mir Masum Shah in Sukkur, 1840s 
Sukkur Rare Pictures: Minar-e-Masum and Tomb of Mir Masum Shah in Sukkur, 1840s - Old Photos of Sukkur
A Rare Photo of Sukkur City on the Banks of Indus River, 1840s 
Sukkur Rare Pictures: A very rare picture of Sukkur city on the banks of Indus River, 1840s - Old Photos of Sukkur
Editor’s Note: If you have liked this page, then please share it on Facebook, Twitter or any other social media. It will encourage the Admin to add more photos of Sukkur. The sharing buttons are at the end of the page.
You may also write your brief comment under the heading “Leave a Reply here”.

Comments

  1. Such a nice Post!!!

  2. Khalid Napar says:

    I am native of Sukkur, the places shown in above pictures, at present most of them are still in same look with slight degradation in condition due to weathering effects.

  3. Syed Abrar Afzal Shah, Lahore says:

    I love this beautiful city.

  4. so beautiful

  5. Nitesh Mahajan says:

    Dear all,
    Thank you for the great pictures. My grandmother was from Sukkur. I heard a lot from my father about his nana’s (grandfather) sweet shop named as “Kaka Ram Punjabi Halwai” in Panchayati Tala area. My father has very blink memories of visiting Sukkur, the shop was near Hanuman Temple.

  6. Roseanna says:

    Do you remember a family by the name of Jiggins? My Dad was born in Sukkur in 1933. My grandfather was also in the Railways. My Dad had two older brothers and a sister.

    • Vinaya Saijwani says:

      My father was born in 1924. May be they even saw each other! Please write more about your family, I love reading about Sukkur and Rohri. My husband was born in Sukkur. His father Kanayalal Sahijwani was a mechanical plumbing contractor in Sukkur.

  7. Saad Hassan says:

    Looking at these pics Sukkur seems to be a nice place and it is very painful that we even not bother to visit even our own Pakistan, what a sorrow. I am from Lahore and I love to visit my country as it is the best and I am proud of been a Pakistani no matter how hard the situation.

  8. Rabia Kanwal says:

    Assalam O ALikum,
    I love Sukkur because its my birth place and want to go back there again. Now-a-days we live in Peshawar because basically we are Pashtoon and our home town in Sawabi. In Sukkur we lived near Takri Peer Cement Factory Colony, in 1999 that factory was closed and my father took a golden-hand shake and then we left Sukkur on 22nd of Oct 1999. Till today I never forget that place and want to again go back there. I pray to ALLAH that give me a chance to go back there again. Ameen-sum-Ameen.

  9. Ravi Rai says:

    Hi, I am a television and cinema writer director in India. The internet would give you an information on me. We recently produced films like ‘Tanu weds Manu’ and the recently released ‘Raanjhana’ directed by my brother Anand Rai. We are Sindhis and actually Raisinghani. My father was from Naushero Feroze and my mother is from Karachi. I am writing a novel, a love story based in Sukkur between a Sindhi girl and a Muslim boy next door. The story begins in 1944 and ends in 1954. A time when the Muslim League and Indian National Congress were at the logger heads and how 1947 tore them apart. But in all this process I am trying to bring back Sindh alive once again. If any of you would want to contribute anything with schools, names of the institutions, streets, hospitals, shops, bakeries, sweet marts, in Sukkur, Rohri, Karachi, Shikarpur, Lahore, Sialkot etc., please let me know. Thanks and regards.
    My email address is ravirai25@hotmail.com

  10. My mother’s family is originally from Rohri and Dad’s family from Karachi. Nani (grandmother) would have recognized the places if she was alive today. Mom keeps saying that Sukkur bridge is famous and in history books. I will show her the photos and see if she recognizes them.

    • Vinaya Saijwani says:

      Sure she will, although she would have been a child when she left Rohri. I have emailed these wonderfully evocative pics to my relatives and my husband’s relatives so they can relive, or live vicariously a time and place we lost.

  11. Vinaya Saijwani says:

    My father Vishin Ochiram Menghani (shortened to Meghani when he crossed over to India in October 1947) was born in Rohri on Jan 12, 1924. He lived in Takkar ki Galli. He attended DJ Sindh College and the law college in Karachi. He was then Junior to Pirzada. He used to tell me stories about how he would cross the Lansdowne Bridge every day, half way by tonga, and then walking to get to Pirzada’s office in Sukkur. He was very sorry to leave Sindh. His family and he were assisted in leaving Sindh by their Muslim neighbors. In Bombay most of his clients were Muslims and he used to like them personally too. My Dad spoke fluent Urdu. I remember they were the most loyal clients. When my Dad fell ill and was unable to practice for several months, most of them refused to take back their files but preferred to wait until Dad was able to get back on his feet.
    Towards the end of his life he kept asking to go back to Sukkur. He missed especially the railway station which was a social gathering spot!
    He would tell my secretary, who is from Karachi, to go to Mohammed Moosa’s shop behind the Municipal Corporation, to get him shoes or clothes(I forget now which).
    When my husband visited Pakistan on work sometime in 2008, he made a trip to Rohri and my Dad followed him on the telephone at 3 am US time, while directing him to go to his home in Takkar ki Galli. He was thrilled to hear his home was still standing.
    My husband brought back photos of Rohri, Sukkur(where my husband was born), Landowne bridge and also soil (matti) from Rohri and Sukkur. I still treasure the soil of my father’s youth and hope to see his ancestral home some day. Jiye Sindh.

    • Faraz Shah says:

      My ancestors were from Narnol city, they migrated to Sukkur, sindh after the independence. The “Takkar Gali” is the place where I have spent almost 18 years near that place. Still there are many Hindu people living in that area.

      • Vinaya Saijwani says:

        Thank you so much. Is it possible to take photos of the street and email or post on this website? My father lived in the house with a door from Rajasthan. In the photo my husband took the house walls were broken and it appeared to be under construction. I will download and send you the photo.

      • Vinaya Saijwani says:

        Mr. Faraz Shah,
        It would be great if you could give me more info on Takkar ki Gali and send any pics if possible. My Dad kept speaking about the place before he passed away in 2010. It would be wonderful to see pics and read and connect with the place. If it had been safe for me to travel I would have made a trip just to see his native home.

        • Vinaya Saijwani,
          It is safe for everyone, don’t depend on media, they always bark. I have many Hindu friends in Sukkur they are living happily. Theere will eb no problem for you in Sukkur, and Sukkkur is the safest city among all. Currently I am studying in Hyderabad. I will go to Sukkur after my exam. I can send you the photos after that but if you connect with me on any social networking site it will be great. This will remind me to take photos for you.

  12. Saleem Ahang says:

    Both the photos given in this blog and informative data provided here not only are exclusively great, interesting and astonishing, but also memorable inheritance from our ancestors. Great thing have been done on this page for public to remind our past. All the great effort of displaying and the things shown are great fully admirable especially the Lansdowne Bridge.

  13. Christian Thommen, Switzerland says:

    Consulting my 1939 copy of “The Railway Gazette”, March 24, pp. 509-11 I found an article treating the “Jubilee of the Landsdowne Bridge” – a structure I had never seen before nor have I ever been to Pakistan. I have learned that British Imperialism has left many traces worth while visiting as well as the actual two cities of Rohri and Sukkur on the Indus river. Thanks for your documentation and the insight into today’s Pakistan.

  14. Very informative, rare pictures of Lansdowne Bridge. I am hungry to visit this place soon. Specially information about 7 canals, and comparison with Suez Canal and others. Good job done. Hope we can make any historical documentary about this place.

  15. So amazing, thank you for sharing this archive.

  16. Izhar Mirani says:

    Awesome pics!

  17. Jazib Jahan Khan says:

    Beautiful city of my beautiful country. Pakistan Zindabad

  18. Hassan Azeemi says:

    Great work!!!

  19. Wow!! Great knowledge about my native city.

  20. It was indeed a pleasure to see the pictures of the famous Lansdowne Bridge and Sukkur Railway Station. My father was Station Master at Rohri Junction (1954-58). I and my brothers and sisters had the pleasure of travelling daily by train to St Mary’s High School Sukkur. The train went over Lansdowne Bridge at a restricted speed of 10 MPH because the bridge had outlived its age. In 1962 they built another one alongside the Lansdowne Bridge named Ayub Bridge.

  21. Heather Brown says:

    Please refer to the above photo captioned, “Under construction Bungalow at the Site of Lloyd Barrage, Sukkur, 1924″.
    I think my mother was born in the building on the right in 1930. Was it called Indus Side? She is the daughter of the late Sir Arnold Musto who was an engineer working on the Barrage.

  22. Maj Siraj (17 Long Course), USA says:

    Thank you for reviving old memories. After the Partition of 1947, my father who was in Railways was posted to Rohri. I along with my two sisters attended St. Mary’s School at Sukkur.

Leave a Reply here